Commercial/Business

25 03, 2020

Can I collect my debts under the new COVID-19 insolvency changes?

2020-03-26T07:37:02+09:30

Do the temporary changes to insolvency law mean that you won’t get paid? Sort of. You should get paid eventually (if the debtor makes it through these challenging times), but your options to force a company or individual into insolvency will be delayed. TIP: With these changes, it is now supercritical to properly assess the [...]

Can I collect my debts under the new COVID-19 insolvency changes?2020-03-26T07:37:02+09:30
25 03, 2020

Do I have to refund the deposit? ‘Event cancelled!’

2020-03-25T11:29:36+09:30

COVID-19 has meant that weddings, parties and celebratory events are being cancelled all over the country.  In many cases these events are merely postponed, but if you are a caterer, party planner or event manager, the question you need answering is ‘do I have to refund the deposit?’

Do I have to refund the deposit? ‘Event cancelled!’2020-03-25T11:29:36+09:30
22 03, 2020

How to use gift cards and vouchers to get you through these difficult times

2020-03-22T17:18:49+09:30

We all want to support our local businesses during this period of ‘social distancing’. One way for us to do this it is to purchase ‘vouchers’ or ‘gift cards’ from our local merchants. If you are in business and you want to put a voucher scheme in place, read this to find out how.

How to use gift cards and vouchers to get you through these difficult times2020-03-22T17:18:49+09:30
8 02, 2020

Should you own your farmland in Super?

2020-02-08T22:05:29+09:30

A common frustration experienced by primary producers is that they cannot use their super savings in their business. Not being able to access your retirement savings until you are 60 (generally) and retired, can feel like you are diverting capital away from where it is needed. One way around this issue is to own farmland in your Self-Managed Super Fund (SMSF).

Should you own your farmland in Super?2020-02-08T22:05:29+09:30
13 12, 2019

Why you need a succession plan for your SMSF

2019-12-13T14:04:10+09:30

The trustee of your SMSF is all-powerful. The trustee decides how much money you can put in the fund, who else can join, how your money is invested, how much gets paid out to you and when, and finally who gets what’s left over when you die. So how do you ensure the trustee of your fund continues to do the right thing when you can no longer be involved? There are a number of strategies you need to have in place

Why you need a succession plan for your SMSF2019-12-13T14:04:10+09:30
10 10, 2019

Beware: You could be personally liable for underpaying staff

2019-10-11T12:40:01+09:30

Given the increasing heat being placed on directors and business owners, it's important for you to understand the legal requirements and put in place compliance systems so that employees are being paid their legal wages and entitlements.

Beware: You could be personally liable for underpaying staff2019-10-11T12:40:01+09:30
20 08, 2019

Careful what you say about the future – misleading representations

2019-09-17T08:07:11+09:30

It’s not unusual to make a decision to enter into an agreement, based on a statement or promise by the other party about what the future will hold. Then when that promise doesn’t hold or ring true, you could find yourself out of pocket.

Careful what you say about the future – misleading representations2019-09-17T08:07:11+09:30
20 08, 2019

Sharpcan Case Update – Revenue expenditure or capital expenditure?

2019-08-22T08:44:57+09:30

Our opinion about the Sharpcan case (Commissioner of Taxation v Sharpcan Pty Ltd [2018] FCAFC 163), being a Federal Court case from late 2018 (a copy of the full judgment can be found here: https://www.ato.gov.au/law/view/pdf/misc-case/rdr_2018fcafc163.pdf).

Sharpcan Case Update – Revenue expenditure or capital expenditure?2019-08-22T08:44:57+09:30
7 08, 2019

Hey founder, are you being left behind?

2019-09-17T08:07:17+09:30

Founding a company is a lot easier than retaining control of it. Part of your journey will necessarily involve other people. First, it may be a co-founder. Then family and friend investors, and ultimately professional investors. During this evolution, the chances of you being left behind, and things getting out of control, increase exponentially. We’ll help you get back in control, with a binding entitlement to what you’re worth.

Hey founder, are you being left behind?2019-09-17T08:07:17+09:30
18 04, 2019

When should directors be personally liable for tax debts?

2019-09-17T08:07:57+09:30

As a general rule, a company provides its shareholders with ‘limited liability’. This means that the extent of resources a shareholder risks when they invest in an enterprise is limited to the amount of capital they put into the company (or agree to put in). If the company runs out of resources, or gets hit with a nasty surprise, the capital may all be lost, but the shareholders are not obliged to put anything additional in. They have just ‘done their doe’. The limitation of liability for shareholders has not really changed much over the centuries that limited liability companies have been around. What has changed, is the role and responsibility of directors.

When should directors be personally liable for tax debts?2019-09-17T08:07:57+09:30
1 03, 2019

Crime never pays, but you might have to.

2019-03-01T15:33:05+09:30

As a business owner, you trust your employees to be honest. It’s therefore every employer’s worst fear to find out that an employee has been stealing from you. But what if then, that employee sues you, and your lawyer tells you that employee has a case?

Crime never pays, but you might have to.2019-03-01T15:33:05+09:30